tsmrwhk*
K E E P I N G I T S U R R E A L
tsmrwhk*
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#timehop #twoyearsago
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#LEEDS
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#qualitytoiletgraff
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cupcakekatieb-eyecandy:

fasterpussycatgifgif:

Bronson (2008). Dir. Nicolas Winding Refn.

Sexxxxxay
cupcakekatieb-eyecandy:

fasterpussycatgifgif:

Bronson (2008). Dir. Nicolas Winding Refn.

Sexxxxxay
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dezeen:

This bike has been designed to pack into a bag »
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gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
gasoline-station:

Awaiting, 2014
by Sascha Nau
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shoulderblades:

@chloebbby
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beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
beckerrarebooks:

These whimsical images come from the mind of Louis Crusius, a physician and artist who was born in Wisconsin and later moved to St. Louis, Missouri.  The Antikamnia Chemical Company used Crusius’ images in a series of calendars they published from 1897-1901, which they sent to physicians who could prove their medical standing.
The company, whose name means “opposed to pain,” was known for manufacturing a patent medicine called Antikamnia tablets.  Like most patent medicines of the time, the ingredients in the tablets could have ill effects - the tablets contained acetanilide, which could cause cyanosis (a condition in which the skin becomes blood due to insufficient oxygen).
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adventroyals:

Follow Advent Royals | Royalty Never Dies